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15 Great Books Every College Girl Should Read

College girls often read some books, and they feel the same. A good book will make you smart and mature. The following are 15 Great Books Every College Girl Should Read. I hope it will be helpful to everyone! 

Shakespeare once said: "Books are the nourishment of the world. There is no book in life as if there is no sunshine. As a college girl, read books to enrich yourself. The following college girl books to read in 2021.

Good books for college girls introduce the books that every college girl must-read. Girls who enter college or university need to improve their inner self-cultivation continuously, and reading is a good way to improve self-cultivation and increase wisdom. 

The following editor is here to recommend 15 Great Books Every College Girl Should Read, welcome to read! Inspirational suitable books for college girls to read in 2021.
books-every-college-girl-should-read

Essential Pleasure Reading Books For College Students Should Read


    15 Great Books Every College Girl Should Read

      

    1. Silent Spring 


    books-every-college-girl-should-read

    Silent Spring by Rachel Carson

      "Silent Spring" is the masterpiece of American female writer Rachel Carson. This book is hailed as the beginning of modern environmental protection. The author begins with a fable, depicting a sudden change in a beautiful village. And from land to sea, from sea to sky, the harm of chemical pesticides is fully revealed.

      It not only runs through the rigorous and realistic scientific rational spirit but also is full of humanistic feelings of reverence for life. It is said to have caused a greater sensation than Darwin's "Origin of Species".



    2. The Neurotic Personality of Our Time 


    books-every-college-girl-should-read

    The Neurotic Personality of Our Time by Karen Horney

      Karen Horney is an authority figure in western psychology with many followers. She is the main representative of the contemporary new psychoanalytic school in the West, the main representative of Neo-Freudism, and one of the earliest advocates of social psychology.

      "The Neurotic Personality of Our Time" is Horney's masterpiece. The author believes that each of us is constantly in various contradictions and conflicts in our hearts, and the most important conflict is that we all have the urge to "get close to others", "against others", and "escape from others" at the same time. If these impulses are not well-coordinated, it will cause us to fall into all kinds of anxiety and neurosis.



    3. Hello World


    books-every-college-girl-should-read

    Hello World: Where Design Meets Life by Rawsthorn

      As the chief critic of design affairs in the UK, Alice Laussern publishes two design columns each week in dozens of newspapers and magazines around the world. She is a director of the Art Council of England, a client of London's Whitechapel Gallery, chairman of the Council of Chessenheim Gallery, and the author of "The Story of Yves Saint Laurent".

      "Hello World" explores the impact of design on our lives and describes the use of design by warlords, scientists, farmers, hackers, radicals, and designers in history for different purposes: from the invention of pirates in the eighteenth century The scary sign of intimidating its victims to surrender, to a woman’s pursuit of prostheses, and the evolution of World Cup football.



    4. And Then There Were None 


    books-every-college-girl-should-read

    And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

      Agatha Christie is the undisputed queen of detective fiction and one of the greatest writers of detective literature. "No Life" has sold more than 100 million copies of the world's single-volume work and has been adapted into 20 film and television dramas. 

    The drama of the same name has been performed continuously for 70 years. It created a mode of killing on an island and is an immortal masterpiece of classical reasoning.

      Ten strangers with different identities were invited to a mansion on an isolated island, but the owner did not show up. That night, a mysterious voice uttered the secret of the sin in everyone's heart. Then, a guest died bizarrely. 

    The storm isolated the island from the world, and "Ten Little Soldiers"-this ancient nursery rhyme became a death spell. As predicted in the ballad, the guests died one after another...After the killing game, none of them survived.



    5. The Tale of Genji 


    books-every-college-girl-should-read

    The Tale of Genji by Murasaki Shikibu

      Zishibu's surname was Fujiwara, and because her eldest brother was Shibucheng, he was called Fujishibu. Later, she wrote "The Tale of Genji", in which the heroine Zihime was recited by the world, and was then called Zishibu.

      The generation of "The Tale of Genji" was the heyday of the Heian Dynasty aristocratic society under the rule of Fujiwara Michichi. During this period, the upper-class aristocrats in Ping An Jing enjoyed themselves freely. On the surface, they were peaceful and prosperous, but in fact, they were full of extremely complicated and acute contradictions. 

    "The Tale of Genji" is based on this history. Through the life experience and love story of the protagonist Genji, it describes the corrupt politics and lewd life of the aristocratic society at that time. It truly reflects the appearance of this era with a typical artistic image. And features. "The Tale of Genji" opened up a new path in Japanese Monogatari literature, bringing Japanese classical realism literature to a new peak.



    6. Out of Africa 


    books-every-college-girl-should-read

    Out of Africa by Karen Blixen

      Karen Brixen was born in Rust, Denmark. He has won the Andersen Prize and the Pentopidan Prize and was nominated for the Nobel Prize twice. Together with Andersen, he is also known as Denmark's "national literary treasure". 

    Her most famous work is the autobiographical novel "Out of Africa". The film of the same name has won seven Oscars in one fell swoop.

      "Out of Africa" ​​depicts the life story of "I" running a coffee farm in Africa from 1914 to 1931. The author's ingenuity has combined many people, things, sceneries, and things into one furnace. Between the lines, there is pure love for this hot land of Africa and its thriving people.



    7. Gone with the Wind 


    books-every-college-girl-should-read

    Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

      The movie of the same name starring Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable is also very classic, but the spiritual connotation of the characters can be explored from the book. 

    The protagonist Scarlett in the book is a cat-like woman. She is beautiful, vanity, greedy, and unscrupulous, throughout the youth stage. She was immersed in her first love for Ashley and turned a blind eye to the people she really needed and suit her. 

    Fortunately, she finally knew her mistake and acted immediately to save Rite, who loved her deeply. The most shining part of this book is not here, but the strength that is highlighted in Scarlett’s complex character, a tenacious will to survive when faced with difficulties, she is calm in the face of danger, and she defends her home. 

    Her determination, her efforts to get rid of poverty, and the Civil War described in the book also help us understand the history of the United States.



    8. #GirlBoss 


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    #GirlBoss by Sophia Amoruso

    Sophia Amoruso is the owner of NASTY GAL, an American e-commerce clothing brand. During her free time as a doorman at a vocational school, the 22-year-old opened an eBay store and the first item she sold was a stolen book. At the age of 19, she is a shoplifter, listening to anarchist rock. 

    At the age of 18, she ran away from home, hitchhiking on the highway, and was almost raped by a Russian. At the age of 17, his parents divorced. At the age of 16, she was diagnosed with a mental illness and has since left school to study at home. 

    This book is not her autobiography, and she also refuses to label her own book as entrepreneurial inspiration. "#GIRLBOSS" is an internet blog-style collage-style shopping essay. She is the author, she is the protagonist, so only she can reveal the secret of NASTY GAL's success. The success of NASTY GAL is closely related to her.

    "Abandon the lifestyle and habits that keep you stuck. Opportunities are created by yourself." In this way, she cut off her unbearable absurd life, and her life has passed a turning point.

    Like many successful people, she is a doer and she will never abandon details. She is both the CEO and creative director. Her eBay store stands out because only the product thumbnails can tell the style of the clothes in the unenlarged image. If a certain piece of clothing cannot be sold, let's change the description. The combination of various things creates unlimited possibilities.

    The same is true for people. Attributable to the opportunities for parents to fall in love, the birth environment, and the growth story, each person is only one part of a trillion. Wilde said: "Don't be another person. Other people have already become others." This is a customs clearance story that challenges the setting of "If it doesn't happen, no one proves it is possible." She is not lucky, she relies on strength.

    In addition to success studies, another aspect of this book is feminine consciousness. This does not need to accuse the oppression of patriarchy. Success like a normal person is the success of women.

    In addition to the protagonist’s entrepreneurial experience, each chapter is accompanied by essays from different female leaders in the U.S. Internet industry. They are all #GIRLBOSS-trendy, Internet, young, independent, and open up their own fields. The legendary story of the author and protagonist makes this book interesting.



    9. You Are a Badass


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    You Are a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Your Greatness and Start Living an Awesome Life by Jen Sincero 

    In the past two weeks, I have been traveling by myself in California and reading this book on transportation--which turned out to be a perfect combination. Meeting the animals in San Diego, stepping on the desserty land, seeing the Golden Gate Bridge, walking through the Chinese/Japanese/Hippie/Gay/...districts. 

    I finally am able to detach from my past trauma; I finally am able to forgive and forget what had happened to me; I finally am ready to move on and kick ass.

    Many ideas from this book rang a bell to me. It made me discover and change some of my thinking patterns, as well as empowered me to embrace my badassery. 

    For example, I had been replaying some harsh words I was told in my head for the past 5 months. I could not help but analyze over and over again which is valid and which is not, doubting and victimizing myself while creating hatred towards the other person. 

    This book made me realize that forgiving is not able the other person, but it is about me--I am not letting the other person off the hook; I will be actually setting myself free. Whatever I am thinking means nothing to the other person now, nor would it change the reality, yet I have the right to choose: to have it keep bothering me? Or to let it go? And I let it go.

    This is the book I want to revisit time after time, and hopefully, its magic will never die. As I said, I read it on transportation, so I was not able to actually carry out some of the tips she mentioned. 

    I am sure if you follow every tip she recommended, it will make a whole lot of difference for you. I am soon about to move into the next chapter in my life. I cannot guarantee that I will never feel that bad again; I know there will still be mood swings, big or small, but I will keep believing that The Universe loves me and has everything ready for me, and I will keep loving this awesome, talented, artistic, emotional, sensitive, curious, courageous, positive, and badass me. 



    10. Me Before You 


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    Me Before You by Jojo Moyes

    Yesterday I finished reading a novel called Me Before You, and at the end of the story reminded me of that legend. The protagonist Will's life is torn in half by a traffic accident. 

    In the first half of his life, he had the setting of a standard life winner: a superior family background, a successful career, a beautiful girlfriend, and he went climbing Kilimanjaro or ride a foreign country in his free time. And it all ended on a rainy morning in London, and when he woke up he had become a patient with high paraplegia. 

    Two years later, he chose to end his 35-year life. His parents won an extra 6 months, and he was willing to wait 6 months for his parents. At this time, he met Lousia, an unemployed girl, to be his carer. Two people whose lives are terrible try to save each other's lives after getting to know each other.

    I thought it would be an inspirational story or a perfect love story. I thought that the story would end with a secret garden in the end. With the help of the heroine, the male protagonist regained his health and stood up. But the novel did not develop into a story on stage in the end. Will finally left, in Dignitas, Switzerland. 

    He said that after the damn accident, his family and friends tried to control his illness, control his daily life, control all corners of his life, and no one asked him how he wanted to live, and death was probably It is the only thing he can control. If there is no way to live with dignity, at least one can die with dignity.



    11. A Thousand Splendid Suns


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    A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini

    Marian, a 15-year-old illegitimate daughter, lives with her mother in a humble hut in the mountains. Her biggest wish is to watch a movie with her father for her birthday. Unexpectedly, she caused her mother to commit suicide and forced herself to marry a 40-year-old. Widower shoe dealer. 

    Twenty years later, Laila, a well-educated 15-year-old girl from a middle-class family, lost all her relatives in the war. In order to survive, she had to choose to marry Marianne's surly husband.

    Although Marianne and Laila are 19 years old and have very different concepts of love and family, their fate is entangled because of war and bereavement. After experiencing the torture of their husbands together, they not only sympathized with their sisters, but even more interdependent like mothers and daughters, and finally reversed their own life paths.

    With a touching force, the author depicts how Afghan women desperately endured suffering and struggled with fate under the gunfire, hunger, tyranny, and fear, and how they bravely sacrificed themselves by virtue of their love for their families. In the end, it is also love, or the memory of love, which supports the survivors to live bravely.

    This is an unforgettable and heartbreaking story about a cruel age, an impossible friendship, and a love that can never be destroyed.

    Although life is full of pain and bitterness, every sad story can make people see a faint light of hope. Thought-provoking and touching, "A Thousand Splendid Suns" analyzes the deepest meaning of love, sacrifice, and life. On every page of "A Thousand Splendid Suns", hidden emotions are active: they are beautiful, great, and enduring emotions that cannot be seen in the local society.



    12. All the Light We Cannot See


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    All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr 

    The story is about war. It offered a look at war from kids' perspectives, a French girl who was blind since the age of six, and a German boy who had a gift with mechanical things, math, waves, and radios.

    From a technical point, the story was very well crafted. The chapters were short, effective, and followed two separate lines surrounding the two main characters. It went back and forth in time, not exactly following the chronological order, but the arrangement worked. 

    And after all the extensive buildup and the girl and the boy's paths are finally crossing, I am really worried, even nervous, because I do not know where the story will lead us and how it is going to end. Well, it is an ending with a lot of hearts.

    The writing was very skillful and beautiful. I got lost in the passages, when exquisite beauties and wonders in life were presented in a fascinating way, such as seashells, birds, radio waves, colors in the mind of a blind girl, the streets of Paris, the gems. 

    These are in stark contrast with the brutality and ugliness of war. What emerged is an extremely powerful story, a story that is likely going to stay in the minds of readers long after it was read. I have not read a story this good for quite some time, and I am getting Anthony Doerr's other books too.



    13. The Light Between Oceans


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    The Light Between Oceans by M.L. Stedman 

    At 3:30 in the morning, I closed the last page of "The Light Between the Oceans", and the tears on the corners of my eyes were still moist. I read the last two-thirds of the novel in one night, perhaps because the climax of the story is slowly coming, and I always want to know the ending. But what I didn't expect was that the ending of the story made me cry. 

    In the last chapter, I almost finished the last page with tears blurring my vision. The ending may be a fair and reasonable arrangement for the biological mothers Hannah and Lucy-Grace, just like the name of Lucy Grace at the end. But for the heroine Isabel, it's really too cruel. When I read Isabel's cancer was about to leave, I used to read the words between the lines at the fastest speed, hoping that she could meet her little Lucy for the last time. 

    However, the last thing I met with Lucy-Grace was a letter from her and the things she cherished when she was a child. I once read that the protagonist Tom Sherborne sent a letter and silver bell to Hannah, and finally confessed all the truth, I hated him like Isabel in the book. But after closing the book and calming down, he slowly thought about it. 

    Finally, he bravely confessed everything that humanity really should do. I fell into deep contemplation. Maybe if Hannah was used as the protagonist in the novel, then the suffering of Hannah losing her husband and children would be more miserable and pitiful, and I would hate Isabel again. This is the intricate emotional world of human beings. 

    Everyone in the world has unique emotions. No two people can truly communicate with each other from birth to death. So, this is probably why people feel the existence of loneliness. It's just that some people feel it strongly, some people feel it slightly, and some people feel it for a long time.



    14. 13 Reasons Why


    books-every-college-girl-should-read

    13 Reasons Why by Jay Asher

    The story tells that a girl who seems popular to outsiders committed suicide very suddenly. She recorded a tape before her death, recording the stories of the 13 people who led her to commit suicide and ensured that the tape would be transmitted to these 13 people one by one after her death. 

    The male lead is one of these 13 people. He can be said to be a classmate who is independent of the female lead. In the recording of the confession, the male protagonist recalls the girl's previous life from his outsider's vision while listening, combined with his hearing, and the description of the environment in which he is currently listening to the recording. 

    The three main lines of the story are intertwined. The language is very every day, but the story gives the story a more complete vision through these three main lines. Different from the usual suicide stories, the heroine is not a very negative person. Even when she talks about the 7th and 8th people, she keeps emphasizing, "I never thought about suicide at this time, and I think suicide is very incomprehensible. thing'. 

    She is just a person who will not use proper methods to ask for help from the people around her after her psychological injury. From her descriptions, we can see that her world is slowly disintegrating. It is a thought-provoking counter-example of adolescence.

    I watched it when I was 18 years old, and it might resonate a lot because of it. This is the first tragedy I have seen, but I think it was written wonderfully. Literary talent is every day but very beautiful.

    Personally, I think it is very suitable for people who are just starting to read the original English books~ because the story is very compelling and compelling to keep reading. Finally, I suggest that if you read it, you don’t have to look through the dictionary for some words that you don’t know. Looking through the dictionary will destroy the coherent enthusiasm of reading. I guess it’s good to read it.



    15. Fifty Shades Trilogy


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    Fifty Shades Trilogy (Fifty Shades of Grey / Fifty Shades Darker / Fifty Shades Freed) by E L James

    Who can believe that such a glamorous and vulgar novel can become popular across the country in just a few months, breaking the record set by the Harry Potter series and becoming the fastest-selling novel in history? JK ROWLING has chest tightness and trouble. Stephenie Meyer has a dislocated jaw. The male compatriots are all pitying and sighing. 

    The Viagra manufacturer needs to develop new products. Ann Summers, the marketing manager of Ann Summers, is happy. Whether children’s magic, vampire zombies, or dragon tattoo girls, it’s not worth the word “sex” after all. Sex Sells, that is the rule.

    It took me 3 nights to read the first book "50 shades of Grey", 827 pages in total. It’s not so much that it’s in all kinds of glamorous pictures that I spend most of my time thinking about this Christian Grey. 

    The book tells the whole story from the perspective of the heroine Anastasia Steele in the first person. The protagonist Ana's roommate stalked Grey's personnel department before getting an opportunity to interview Grey, but the roommate caught a bad cold at the appointed interview time, so Ana went to the interview on her behalf and met Grey. 

    From the first moment Ana saw Grey, she was subdued in every aspect under the image of this young, witty, and brilliant "dominant president", and the overbearing president also showed her favor to Ana with various tricks.

    Later, the two became familiar with each other and established a romantic relationship. During the period, Ana described the stories of several ambiguous subjects, but whenever she thought of Grey's "beautiful face", she fell into Grey's arms.




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