15 Best Fantasy Books for Beginners to Read in 2024

Dive into captivating worlds with our curated list of easy-to-read fantasy books. Perfect for beginners seeking adventure and enchantment.
I have received many requests to recommend some of the entry-level easy-to-read fantasy books. In response, I'm pleased to offer my expert recommendations in this article which is based on my in-depth study and extensive research in this field.

Some notable fantasy books for beginners include Graceling, A Song of Wraiths and Ruin, Throne of Glass, Scythe, Spin the Dawn, Nevermoor, The Cinder Spires, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, The City of Brass, and The Name of the Wind.

These aren't the only books on this topic. Below, you'll find 20 books with detailed descriptions of each of these outstanding resources, helping you make well-informed decisions in your fantasy series journey.

An open fantasy book and a glowing globe on a stand with twinkling lights in the background, creating a cozy, and magical atmosphere for beginners.

1. Graceling


Graceling by Kristin Cashore

Graceling by Kristin Cashore

Katsa has been able to kill a man with her bare hands since she was eight--she's a Graceling, one of the rare people in her land born with an extreme skill. 

As the niece of the king, she should be able to live a life of privilege but Graced as she is with killing, she is forced to work as the king's thug. 

When she first meets Prince Po, Graced with combat skills, Katsa has no hint of how her life is about to change. 

She never expects to become Po's friend. She never expects to learn a new truth about her own Grace--or about a terrible secret that lies hidden far away.. a secret that could destroy all seven kingdoms with words alone."


2. A Song of Wraiths and Ruin


A Song of Wraiths and Ruin by Roseanne A. Brown

A Song of Wraiths and Ruin by Roseanne A. Brown 

It's a West African-inspired fantasy with immersive world-building and an interesting magic system.

The story follows a boy and girl who are enemies but develop feelings for each other.

It's a good book for those who are new to fantasy and might find high fantasy overwhelming.

The book is a debut novel with a sequel coming out soon, making it a good time to start reading.


3. Throne of Glass


Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas

Throne of Glass by Sarah J. Maas

The more you hope, the harder you fall. To be honest, two chapters are my limit. The whole text reveals a strong Mary Sue atmosphere. 

Not to mention that it is completely different from Ice and Fire, it is also far from The Hunger Games. Is the heroine really a trained killer?! What nonsense! 

Sarah J. Maas’s writing style can no longer be described as bad. American teenagers are so impressed by it that they are really out of their minds.


4. Scythe


The setting of the immortality world is novel and enticing. The matter of life and death hovers through the whole story, kinda pushing you to contemplate this question subconsciously.

For scythes like Citra and Rowan living in such a world, I guess the most important thing is to know yourself and figure out who you truly are. 

The two young characters are adorable and you are with them all the way round, seeing them advancing during this enigmatic and also dramatic journey. You'll be touched by their struggles and faith in their hearts.


5. Spin The Dawn


Spin the Dawn by Elizabeth Lim

Spin the Dawn by Elizabeth Lim

I don't normally get all that excited when reading YA fantasy, like, at all, as often, it is always the same thing over and over and over again. 

Read the most(or a few) popular ones, and the rest are simply all trying to imitate that success, every single time. 

Which is truly unfortunate. Yet for some reason, I keep wanting to give young adult fantasy more tries, despite it, for the most part, lagging far behind adult fantasy in most aspects.

The thing was, was that I was actually sort of excited to start this, generally good ratings with a world based on the East were all pretty cool to see. 

And besides, it is about tailoring, which is not normally a topic that is seen too often, especially when it is made the center of the storyline.

I actually really enjoyed part one of the book and just for that part alone, my rating was leaning towards four stars, but with parts two and three of the book, I dropped it down to an unfortunate two. I'm aware lots of people did really love this book, but please do respect my opinion.


6. Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan Crow


Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend

Nevermoor: The Trials of Morrigan Crow by Jessica Townsend

The part before the protagonist enters Nevermoor is very similar to HP, and I wanted to relive HP several times. 

The several tests are the most interesting part, but they can't cover up the childish design and the protagonist's cheating. I also don’t like to make things mysterious. 

Jupiter waits until the end to answer the protagonist’s questions and so on. I also have no feelings for the characters. I don’t understand why Hawthorne and Jack became friends with the protagonist, but their friendship didn’t develop. 

As for the character of the protagonist, the character developed after 11 years of life, and the background of unwarranted accusations is no different from that of a child from an ordinary family. 

I don’t think there is anything special about it. Furthermore, the villain, besides paving the way for the protagonist, doesn’t know what he wants to do, and I don’t know what he likes about the protagonist. 

He has lived for hundreds of years and still behaves like a young man. Overall, neither engaging nor boring.


7. The Cinder Spires: The Aeronaut's Windlass


The Cinder Spires: The Aeronaut's Windlass by Jim Butcher

The Cinder Spires: The Aeronaut's Windlass by Jim Butcher

The steam crystal world on the chimney needs to be built, and there are five or six protagonists who have to fight until they are exhausted and covered with injuries as usual. 

Naturally, there is not much space to tell the plot, so the story is relatively thin. Fortunately, the protagonists seem to be good for the time being. The teenagers are clear and upright, and they are not narcissistic or self-harming. 

The author's views are relatively positive when not suppressed by narcissism. Although the POV is arrogant, the cats' names are all based on the sounds of the cats.


8. The Ocean at the End of the Lane: A Novel


The Ocean at the End of the Lane: A Novel by Neil Gaiman

The Ocean at the End of the Lane: A Novel by Neil Gaiman

This book seems to be a fantasy novel for children, but in my opinion, it is undoubtedly a fairy tale suitable for adults. 

Some plots in the book may only be understood by adults, and many details in it may only be understood by adults. When you grow up, you will have some understanding when you look back at the path you have taken. 

The book tells the story from the perspective of a seven-year-old boy. An adventure with Moti brings monsters from another world who act as nannies and hungry birds that can devour monsters, stars, and the world. And the neighbor at the end of the driveway. 

It is a witch who is the same age as the universe. They all seem to be unrealistic fantasies, but these fantasies are actually a reflection of everyone's inner world as they grow up. 

Inner loneliness and fear can be transformed into powerful monsters and hungry birds. but every time there is a strong spiritual power that can help us overcome inner difficulties, just like the witch who firmly supports herself, and when the little boy is immersed in the ocean in the bucket, 

He becomes an omniscient person who knows everything, almost I have lost myself a little bit, and in the process of growing up, how many times will I encounter such a situation where I lose myself?.


9. The City of Brass: A Novel


The City of Brass: A Novel by S. A Chakraborty

The City of Brass: A Novel by S. A Chakraborty

Although it is classified as Adult Fantasy, I personally feel it is closer to YA (teenagers). If you are not familiar with Middle Eastern culture, it may be difficult because there are many new words. 

In the beginning, the heroine's behavior is a bit too teenage, and the strong sense of entitlement she shows when getting along with the second male lead (?) is completely inconsistent with her growth experience of struggling to survive in the streets of Cairo. 

And then the male protagonist... he was so stupid and naive at the beginning, it was almost like he was living in a fantasy land. The second male lead carries a violent, terrifying, and absolute power of beauty when he fights. 

But when the male lead is not fighting, he often acts like a hot-tempered reckless man, and his charm value drops like a flood. 

However, in the last fifth of the book, the pace suddenly picks up speed and conflict breaks out, which is very exciting. In addition, it is rare to see fantasy novels with Middle Eastern themes, so I give it four stars.


10. The Name of the Wind


The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss

After reading the whole book, I feel that the stage for the hero has just been set up. There are still many stories that have not been told, many difficulties that have not been overcome, and many secrets that have not yet been revealed. This is a good book. 

It unexpectedly broke the impression that it was just another fantasy story. In addition to fantasy, there are many other things, such as philosophy. In addition to the protagonist, there are also many supporting characters.

The author of this book has always revealed warmth and touchingness in some small plots.

For example, when a legendary hero first began to feel that he was some kind of hero, it was not that he killed the dragon or rushed through the sea of fire to save a girl, but that he cast "magic" on a little girl. She, this magic will always protect you.

For example, to describe the women in my life, "let me say one thing before I start. I've told stories in the past, painted pictures with words, and told hard lies and harder truths. 

Once I sang colors to a blind man. That, I think, was easier than this. Trying to make you understand her with nothing more than words. You have never seen her, never heard her voice. You cannot know."


11. Duel of Fire


Duel of Fire by Jordan Rivet

Duel of Fire by Jordan Rivet

Dara Ruminor is a competitive duelist in Vertigon, where athletes live like kings as long as the crowds love them. She's good with a sword but can't figure out how to charm the spectators like a true champion.

When Dara is asked to train with Prince Siv, the heir to the throne, she faces her most difficult opponent yet. Handsome, charismatic, and utterly infuriating, he refuses to take the sport or her seriously.

But someone wants Prince Siv dead, and Dara might be the only one who can protect him. 

With assassins lurking in the shadows and tensions brewing between the kingdom's magic wielders, Dara and Siv need each other's help with more than just dueling. Skill with a blade might not be enough to save them.


12. Harry Potter


Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling

Harry Potter by J. K. Rowling

My parents didn't buy any of it when I was a kid, but I read it thoroughly. I'm grateful to the friends who lent me books, the bookstore owner who tolerated my reading, and the quilt and flashlight late at night. 

At that time, I was eagerly looking forward to the Hogwarts owl, hoping to become a member of Slytherin - ambition and nobility were worthy of me. 

Now, the days when Hogwarts started school "nineteen years later" have passed. It has been since I turned eleven and I have read Hogwarts twice, and I still haven't waited for the notification sent by the owl. I have become an extremely mediocre adult. 

Fortunately, I still have some unrealistic dreams in my mind and a pen in my hand that still has the desire to talk. At this time, I firmly believe that I am a Gryffindor, and I still have some heroic dreams in a rotten world. 

In other words, it is precisely because of these heroic dreams that I am who I am and that I and others can identify me. My pen is my magic wand, and my story will continue to be written. -Are you still in love with HP, after all this time? -Always.


13. Foundryside: A Novel


Foundryside: A Novel by Robert Jackson Bennett

Foundryside: A Novel by Robert Jackson Bennett

An intriguing fantasy story with a twist of medieval Italian comedy. While the grand picture is yet to be revealed, a war between the creator and his creations can be a very profound theme. Also notice the metaphors behind the scriving, which is a lot like programming.


14. An Ember in the Ashes


An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir

An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir

I like to think that I am a person who has read a fair amount of YA in the past year, and something I have come to realize is that lots of overhyped YA books are massive disappointments, while others are really something special. 

This book falls into the latter, thankfully. If I am being honest, I was in a reading slump when I first saw this book. 

I was hesitant to pick it up and then I began reading Sanderson's Mistborn and put it to the side for a week. I was tempted to DNF it because of said reading slump. 

However, I am glad that I did not though, as I ended up really enjoying this book, which includes the setting, the plot, and the characters.

For the first two hundred pages of the book, it was aiming at about a four start although, as you can probably guess, the last two hundred pages pulled me through and I gave it a five star, which frankly, I was surprised it, as I did not expect it to be this good. 

However, one thing that I will note is that this book does have lots of scenes where rape is mentioned and other scenes that can come out as cruel and brutal, also, lots of death in general due to the nature of the world, so it is not for the more faint-hearted looking for a happy story with happy things.

Very good book, with lovely writing, extremely brutal, and highly recommended to those who haven't yet read it.


15. Mistborn Trilogy


Mistborn Trilogy by Brandon Sanderson

Mistborn Trilogy by Brandon Sanderson

I recently read Sanderson's "Mistborn" trilogy, and it was really exciting, whether it was the empathy aroused by the suppressed and persecuted people, or the excitement brought to the reader by the rebels with a truly noble heart. 

The joy, or the strict logic and exciting battles of the Mist Child's alchemy ability, and even the inner thoughts of every living soul, all make us fascinated by it. 

All these elements are integrated under Sanderson's superb writing skills, weaving a magnificent epic trilogy in the world of Mistborn.

I can say without a doubt that this is one of the best fantasy novels I have read in a few years.

The Ultimate Beginners friendly Easy to read Fantasy Books

High Fantasy:

1. The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
2. The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
3. Eragon by Christopher Paolini
4. The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss
5. A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle
6. The Lord of the Rings trilogy by J.R.R. Tolkien
7. The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch
8. The Poppy War by R.F. Kuang
9. The Priory of the Orange Tree by Samantha Shannon
10. Mistborn: The Final Empire (Mistborn series #1) by Brandon Sanderson

Mythology & Folklore:

1. Percy Jackson & the Olympians series by Rick Riordan
2. Circe by Madeline Miller
3. The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller
4. American Gods by Neil Gaiman
5. Coraline by Neil Gaiman
6. The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker
7. The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden
8. The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley
9. Uprooted by Naomi Novik
10. The Witch's Shadow by Paula Brackston

Coming-of-age:

1. A Wizard of Earthsea by Ursula K. Le Guin
2. Howl's Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones
3. The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill
4. The Amulet of Samarkand by Margaret Lindholm
5. Inkheart by Cornelia Funke
6. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
7. Cinder (Lunar Chronicles #1) by Marissa Meyer
8. Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor
9. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
10. Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogan

Adventure:

1. The Spiderwick Chronicles by Tony DiTerlizzi & Holly Black
2. The Chronicles of Spiderwick by Tony DiTerlizzi & Holly Black
3. The Ranger's Apprentice series by John Flanagan
4. The Alchemyst: The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel by Michael Scott
5. The Amulet of Samarkand by Margaret Lindholm
6. Six of Crows (Six of Crows duology #1) by Leigh Bardugo
7. The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
8. The Edge Chronicles series by Paul Stewart & Chris Riddell
9. The Martian by Andy Weir
10. Artemis by Andy Weir

Lighthearted & Humorous:

1. The Princess Bride by William Goldman
2. Good Omens by Neil Gaiman & Terry Pratchett
3. Soulless (Parasol Protectorate #1) by Gail Carriger
4. The House in the Cerulean Sea by T.J. Klune
5. The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison
6. A Deadly Education (Scholomance #1) by Naomi Novik
7. The Enchanted Forest Chronicles by Patricia C. Wrede
8. Guards! Guards! (Discworld series #8) by Terry Pratchett
9. The Martian by Andy Weir
10. The Once and Future King by T.H. White

Romance:

1. A Court of Thorns and Roses (A Court of Thorns and Roses #1) by Sarah J. Maas
2. The Lunar Chronicles series by Marissa Meyer
3. The Princess Bride by William Goldman (yes, again!)
4. The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley
5. Shadow and Bone (Grishaverse #1) by Leigh Bardugo
6. Graceling (Graceling Realm #1) by Kristin Cashore
7. The Cruel Prince (Folk of the Air #1) by Holly Black
8. The Winternight Trilogy by Katherine Arden
9. Uprooted by Naomi Novik
10. The Witch's Shadow by Paula Brackston

Dark Fantasy:

1. Coraline by Neil Gaiman
2. The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
3. Neverwhere (London Below #1) by Neil Gaiman
4. The Poppy War by R.F. Kuang
5. Six of Crows (Six of Crows duology #1) by Leigh Bardugo
6. The Lies of Locke Lamora by Scott Lynch
7. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
8. The Assassin's Apprentice (Realm of the Elderlings #1) by Robin Hobb
9. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
10. The Raven Cycle series by Maggie Stiefvater

Magical Realism:

1. The House in the Cerulean Sea by T.J. Klune
2. Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel
3. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
4. Midnight Library by Matt Haig
5. The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern
6. The Bear and the Nightingale by Katherine Arden
7. The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker
8. The Midnight Library by Matt Haig
9. Piranesi by Susanna Clarke
10. The Ten Thousand Doors of January by Alix E. Harrow

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